Tag Archive | "fat hate"

Fat people can have eating disorders, too

Fat people can have eating disorders, too

An additional, key takeaway from the recent article I posted about, which examines the morality assigned to certain body types & disorders, was that the media, and society at large, don’t believe that overweight/obese people can have eating disorders. This is due, in large part, to it being ingrained in our culture, via the “pulling ones self up from one’s bootstraps” mentality and other factors, that being fat is a CHOICE, and that with WILLPOWER any fat person can, you know, NOT be fat.

Let’s talk about what is being called binge eating disorder, also known as food addiction. Binging disorder is essentially like bulimia but without purging — an individual is compelled, beyond reasons many can understand, to binge on massive quantities of food. Unlike bulimics, they don’t purge that food (vomit or take laxatives). Here is the Mayo Clinic definition of binge eating disorder:

Binge-eating disorder is a serious eating disorder in which you frequently consume unusually large amounts of food. Almost everyone overeats on occasion, such as having seconds or thirds of a holiday meal. But for some people, overeating crosses the line to binge-eating disorder and it becomes a regular occurrence, shrouded in secrecy.

When you have binge-eating disorder, you may be deeply embarrassed about gorging and vow to stop. But you feel such a compulsion that you can’t resist the urges and continue binge eating.

Although binge-eating disorder is the most common of all eating disorders, it’s still not considered a distinct psychiatric condition. But if you have binge-eating disorder symptoms, treatment can help you.

How sad is that? It’s one of the MOST COMMON eating disorders (hello “obesity epidemic”), yet is not considered a distinct psychiatric condition, like anorexia nervosa.

I would reckon that binge eating disorder sounds familiar to a lot of you. It does to me. While I don’t see myself as a comic picture of a woman sitting on the couch shoveling ice cream, chips and candy into her mouth, I know I have an inappropriate relationship with food, and eat for the wrong reasons. I definitely eat when I’m full and/or not hungry — two of the many symptoms. And I can PUT AWAY massive quantities of food in a relatively short period, for no reason. The only difference between me and the “average” obese American is that I’ve been binging on “healthy” things for the last ten years. This is why we can’t assign moral values to food — it’s not about WHAT you are eating. It’s WHY and HOW. Any unhealthy relationship with food is concerning — not just those who eat “bad” foods.

In the Saguy/Gruys study, finding articles that talked about binge eating disorder was difficult, and in fact articles from the main analysis time frame didn’t exist. Two articles from 2007-on were found, but even those refused to believe that obese/overweight people could have a legitimate disorder, like an anorexic or bulimic.

This, I find, is ridiculous. These eating/food/body disorders are all related, but I believe they manifest in people differently. We always read stories of the high-flying, popular, pretty (middle class white) girl who suffers from anorexia — how could she she is so successful and has it all? Cue (very accurate) discussion of how the individual is so desperate for control over the one thing they have complete autonomy over — their body. I think it’s the same in people with binging disorder — I know it is for me. I was that high-flying (middle class white) girl who had all my shit together — but instead of seeking to control my body by restricting food and striving for a super idealized body type, I rebelled against it — food and eating (and binging) was the one area of my life where I could LOSE control without it having what I saw as “real” consequences (ie: grades wouldn’t drop, etc.). I also think some part of me wanted to rebel against body standards — to my own detriment. (does that give me more feminist street cred, or is it just kind of sad?)

People need to break away from the idea that fat people are to blame for their problems. Do individuals make choices? OF COURSE. But you know what? Someone who is anorexic or bulimic makes a choice not to eat, or to eat and then purge. We examine WHY they make those choices. And we recognize that there are complex, underlying reasons for these compulsions, generally beyond individual control and most often times requiring professional, long term help. Yet we deny this same reasoning and help for the chronically overweight/obese – who quite likely have an eating disorder equally as insidious. The difference is that society heralds thinness, but reviles fat. And the chronic fat hate and negative, critical talk that obese individuals face make their disorder worse, never better. (shaming never works!)

This is why I advocate dropping food guilt. It’s why I don’t believe in the SHEER WILLPOWER diet. It’s why I embrace body positivity and community support. There are dozens of complex factors at play with weight struggles and food addiction. Everyone is already telling you you don’t have “real” problem, and that you just have to be stronger, better, faster, thinner.  STOP saying that shit to yourself — someone needs to stand up for fat people with real, clinically diagnosable problems.  I’m afraid, at this juncture, that it needs to be YOU (and me).

What do you think? Do you think you have a problem with food addiction and/or binge eating disorder?

Posted in Body Issues, Fat Identity, Fat in the Media, Fat Shaming, FeaturedComments (14)

Comment Fail – L.A. Times on whether a fat man can be President

Comment Fail – L.A. Times on whether a fat man can be President

Trigger warning: body snarking, fat shaming, fat hate, Democrat hate, racism, sizeism, ridiculous slurs against President Obama and his wife.

Oh Lordy. LORDY LORDY LOO.

This one is a doozy. I am torn between RAGE and crying.

So the L.A. Times has an editorial questioning whether New Jersey governor Chris Christie, who is overweight/obese and apparently a Presidential hopeful, is fit to be President, given his weight problem.

Yeah, THAT happened. I could write an entire post on the fact that this is a news item, but it’s the comment that quickly go off the rails into rampant, blind rage inducing fat hate, misogyny AND racism! (note: I’m making up names for these commenters)

“Frank”: If Chris Christie was a liberal, would the LA Slimes even bring up his weight issue? – Of course not! Hey Moochelle Obama isn’t exactly Skinny Minny!

<insert comment here that is so blatantly racist I won’t repeat it, but note that the comment below it references it>

“Mary”: are you saying the first lady is obese? really? a big tub of goo? really? and where did you get that other striking word”defumigated”….? please don’t be lazy and utterly undisicplined like Mr. Christie…pick up that dictionary, dick..and figure it out.

“Chris”: The First Lady may have “toned arms” but she is an axe handle wide across her butt. Not that it matters, because she was never elected to anything, and has no constitutional authority whatsoever and the liberal media should stop treating her like she actually mattered in the grand scheme of things.

First of all, WHAT THE FUCK, why is “Moochelle” a thing? WHY IS THIS A THING?  I can’t even BEGIN with how derogatory and body snarking that is as a nickname. Michelle Obama is a cow? Really?

Plus! Bonus “fat people are undisciplined and lazy.”

“Mary” (this time with MORE rampant fat hate!): Can a big tub of goo with no self-discipline and no respect for his own family become president..Imagine that big tub of goo rolling down the gangplank from airforce 1 ..visiting another nation…..good for our image>? look at the photo with this article.. Can you imagine a female candidate that gooey .even getting a chance to run?

Now “Mary” is an interesting case. She defends Michelle Obama and is *kind of* pointing out the double standard with women and body image, but HOLY MOLY is she is nasty piece of work who hates fat people.

I find this argument interesting — that an obese person doesn’t have respect for others, specifically their family. Like obesity is some terrible moral crime that they are inflicting on their loved ones. How DARE they be fat and unhealthy!

“Barney”: I guess respect for family would include President Clinton. He was President. Hillary Clinton is overweight, that seems not to have been an issue. It should be about ability, not appearance.

I had to include this because I honestly can’t tell if they are being snarky. If they are being serious… really? Respect for your family is getting a BJ from an intern and then embarrassing them (and the nation!) by lying about it repeatedly? Hahahahaaha…. FAIL. (so being a cheating McCheaterson is ok as long as you put up with your “overweight” wife?)

 

Frankly, there’s so much going on in just a few comments, that I scarcely know what to say. I’m kind of amazed that that many raging Republican Democrat haters read the L.A. Times. I suppose my key takeaways are:

  • sucks to be a woman!
  • fat people are lazy, disrespectful assholes who have NO redeeming qualities of leadership
  • it’s acceptable to liken a woman to a cow
  • screw your “toned arms,” you have a big butt! FAT COW!
  • but it doesn’t matter if a woman is fat because she’s just arm candy
  • and dagnabbit if husbands aren’t TOTALLY AWESOME for putting up with their “overweight wives”
  • and NO, apparently a fat person can’t be President, because PEOPLE ARE VILE

I am truly floored that people are body snarking Michelle Obama. I’m honestly quite disgusted by it.

Posted in Comment Fail, Fat in the MediaComments (3)

The Invisible (Horrible, Lazy, Unattractive) Fat Person

The Invisible (Horrible, Lazy, Unattractive) Fat Person

This post originally was posted on All The Weigh on June 16, 2011. I am reposting it here for posterity :) If this is new to you, please comment! But also do read the original discussion in the comments on ATW — there’s some good stuff there!

When Kenlie asked me to write a guest post on one of my favorite topics — fat hate in society and the strong influence of media — I was honored and excited. Then I tried to write. Needless to say, this enormous, weighty (ha!) issue ballooned into a post of monstrous proportions. So, I shall preface the following by saying: I edited it down. A lot. I hope to expand on many of the topics I’ve merely touched on in future posts, and through discussion.

For many of you, especially if you’ve lived any portion of your life overweight, that society hates and discriminates against fat people may be horribly obvious and my statements redundant. However, I find that sometimes stating what seems blatantly obvious can set off light-bulbs for others, and yourself. It’s especially important to second-guess the media and how it portrays reality — is something so because the media reflects reality, or because it SHAPES how we perceive and create the world around us?

People like to associate a variety of negative words with "fat people." Most are not true. All of them are hurtful and cruel.

No one likes to talk about discrimination against fat people

We’re a progressive society, constantly making strides against disgusting and demoralizing practices such as racism and homophobia. Minority and underrepresented groups, including but certainly not limited to blacks, Hispanics, Asians and LGBTQ, are becoming increasingly (and rightfully) visible on TV, in film, in music, media and advertising.

Yet hatred continues to be spewed against fat people, in the most extreme incarnation (see: Internet comments). And, more subversively, poking fun at fat people (see: token fat character); making assertions about their bodies, eating, health and fitness habits (fatsplaining, “fat as a lifestyle choice”); and, simply, not including them AT ALL in media, rage in society and culture. Fat people are simultaneously invisible and derided for possessing a number of negative characteristics, thrust upon them by virtue of how they look on the outside.

Fat hate — so bad, we even hate ourselves

The hate that is lobbied against fat people is staggering, pervasive and subversive. It’s so omni-present in media and society that most people don’t notice it, or if they do, they explain it away. Like misogyny which is also so entrenched in society that women themselves don’t realize it most of the time, people tend to have a laundry list of excuses and reasons for why it’s “not that bad” or “you’re just whining” or “you’re too sensitive” when you call them out on fat hate. Fat hate is so pervasive, fat people hate fat people.

No, really. If you are now or have ever been fat, overweight, obese — whatever you want to call it — have a nice, honest think about your past interactions with other fat people. Do you see another fat person — usually one who is bigger than you are — and smugly think to yourself “well, I’d never let myself get that bad!” or “Ugh, they clearly don’t exercise or try to eat right. Put down the cheeseburger.” Or, the slightly more innocuous but just as damning “how did *she* get such a hot guy — she’s fatter than I am!”

Many of these Schadenfreude-esque thoughts are somewhat natural — everyone does it, to almost everyone else — but many people take it beyond the “fleeting, dark thoughts” territory. If a fat person speaks out about discrimination, you certainly do see other large people call that person out for being a whiner, or making waves. Fat people are just as likely to guilt and fat shame as thin people — they do it on The Biggest Loser!

It’s often the fat person who reinforces the fat = bad; thin = good trope, because all our lives, this is what we are taught. One of the best places for this in popular culture? Shows like The Biggest Loser do a lot of good, but next time you watch a season, look at the adjectives the contestants use at the beginning vs. the end, and the clips editors choose to use. I’m not saying obese people can’t be miserable, but the subtle language of weight loss makeover programs is beginning/fat = bad, bad, bad, MISERABLE, unhappy, alone, bad, bad, bad which slowly transitions to thin = I AM SO PRETTY AND HAPPY AND NOTHING IN MY LIFE COULD EVER BE BAD AGAIN.

This just isn’t true! It’s not that you can’t want to be thinner and healthier. But equating being thin with happiness is dangerous. You will have good and happy moments in your life when you are fat, and you will have good and happy moments in your life when you’re thin. Same can be said for misery and feeling rotten.

Why do we think this about ourselves and our lives?

We are taught through relentless skinny images & media messaging that fat = bad... and thin is never thin enou

Blame the media! (no, really, let’s blame the media)

This is because we are taught, through every minutiae of our interaction with each other, through media — TV, film, music, advertisements, magazines, newscasts, etc. — that fat is Ugly. Fat is Bad. Fat is Stupid. Fat is Lazy. Thin (and sexy) = GOOD, LOVELY, AWESOME, BETTER. Most of the time, fat people are invisible. We don’t see people like us in magazines (Plus Size models = size ten. SIZE TEN), or on TV, or in movies. There aren’t fat newscasters (even the friendly, rotund weather man Al Roker is now a Skinny Thing), fat book heroines are few and far between (though better than TV) and, generally, TV and film are a barren wasteland of fat people. We are sent a message every day by the absence of larger people in these positive, informative, fantasy and “beautiful” roles.

Women, especially, rarely see representations of themselves. Teen comedies & dramas feature waif-thin beautiful people having Beautiful People Problems like juggling three boyfriends and finding the perfect dress for Prom. The intrepid, neurotic romantic heroines of rom coms are invariably a size 6 (whittled down the requisite size zero, nowadays), and even when they are meant to be “overweight,” they do it Bridget Jones style and have a size 2 actress “balloon up” to, what?, an eight? There being exceptions to every rule, I concede recent glimmers of hope: Drop Dead Diva & Huge (oh list, you are a short one. And also half cancelled).

In cases where we do see visible fat people, they only come in two “sizes”: trying to lose weight/makeover project and Negative Horrible Foil/Unloveable Sidekick. How many times have you seen the plump, dumpy sidekick crack jokes and end up alone? Invariably, either way, Token Fat Character eats. All the time. Whereas most characters on TV and in movies NEVER EAT (as in, actually chew food)… or use the bathroom (ever notice that?), we always see fat characters chowing down. On Glee, token fat girl Lauren DEMANDS A BRIBE of Cadbury Creme Eggs to join Glee Club. Fellow curvaceous character Mercedes was given an entire plot line about eating cafeteria tater tots. I mean… come on!

Probably the only positive plus size character I can think of from the last 27 years I’ve been on earth is Tracy Turnblad from Hairspray.

Fat girls = 1;Thin People: ELEVENTY-BILLION.

In the one arena where arguably Americans get to see overweight women in highly visible roles — daytime talk show hosts — we get a) Oprah (on a perpetual diet cycle) b) Ricki Lake (couldn’t get work post-Hairspray/fat; starved herself to get her show) c) Star Jones (evil wench who got gastric bypass) d) Rosie O’Donnell (ridiculed in pop-culture for being fat/unattractive when she came out as a lesbian). Yes, we all love Oprah (and her positive contributions to fat issues I think are notable), but she’s Oprah. Daytime TV’s Goddess can be any damn size she wants. Everyone else? Get skinny, then maybe you’ll get work.

I mean, REALLY?

In the end, the message that not only fat people, but thin people get is: fat people are invisible/bad, and only thin, beautiful people deserve happiness/love/positive attention. It trickles down and is pervasive (and equally tied to disturbing trends of misogyny in society), and leads to the real problem: the Othering of fat people, and the rise of flat-out hatred of them.

People are horrible; aka: the Internet kills the filter of basic human decency

You don’t have to go far to see this ugly, judgmental attitude in people — just read the comments on any mainstream article relating to weight loss topics. On my blog, The Curvy Nerd, rather than engage with asinine comments on blogs such as The Huffington Post, Gawker and The Daily Beast, I highlight and poke fun at the worst of the worst — feel free to browse through some of my finds, so far.

Generally, you see the same key phrases over and over again: “fat is a choice,” (aka: Fat As A Lifestyle Choice) “eat less, exercise more,” “I don’t want a fat person to infringe on MY space/life/whatever”.

It’s amazing how little empathy people have for overweight & obese people. They don’t hesitate to dehumanize, denigrate and attack fat people, usually with comments that draw the most outrageous conclusions about fat people in general as well as specific larger individuals (usually in response to commenters and/or public figures who appear to be or confess to be large). These things include, but are certainly not limited to: that you are unhealthy, lazy, ugly, miserable, stupid, entitled (no, really!), dirty, sexless, alone and undeserving of love. Many people will flat out say these things.

Then there are the “concern trolls.” These are people who Don’t Like Fat People, but they translate this into acceptable terms, ie: Fat Is Unhealthy. Then they fatsplain to you/fat people how being fat should make you feel, how it’s essential you Get Healthy and Stop Being Fat. Because they care about you, they do!

People we love can also communicate the message that fat = bad, though generally they do not hate fat people, or you, and will unconsciously say things that hurt you. My favorite is “you’re not fat, you’re beautiful!” Translation (on your end): you’re not fat! Fat is BAD, and you are NICE and I LIKE you… so let’s talk about how BEAUTIFUL you are (to me). I didn’t realize what an insidious phrase this was until recently. I do it too! We need to divorce the ideas that being fat = bad. But it’s a deeply ingrained thought within society (see; media).

Let’s get academic for a moment

Beyond the anecdotal evidence of people being hateful on the Internet, numerous studies have been done on the attitudes people hold towards the obese. One study found that children not only ascribed patently negative attributes to fat people (and positive ones to thin people), but that their views were reflective of their parents (who also participated in the study). An indicative pull-quote:

“Specifically, research shows that children are reluctant to play with overweight peers and are more likely to assign negative adjectives such as lonely, lazy, sad, stupid, ugly, and dirty to an overweight child than to an average weight or lean child.”

We pick up these attitudes young, and hold them for life.

More gems to illustrate a wide-spread trend of discrimination and hatred held against fat people:

Where does all this leave us? Well, the current trend is Let’s Beat Everyone Over The Head With Obesity As A Health Epidemic and OMGSHITTONS of fat reality shows. Instead of approaching the core issue of people hating fat people, the cycle of negativity, issues of food/eating portrayal in advertising, and Healthy At Any Size, we are trying to SHAME fat people into being less fat. Oi vey. But that’s another topic for another (LONG) post. :)

So thank you for having me, and sorry for the essay! I would love to hear everyone’s thoughts — what has your personal experience been, with the media and with other people’s attitudes and expectations?

Posted in Fat Identity, Fat in the Media, Fat Shaming, Featured, Meta/Personal, TVComments (2)

Fat hate & body image – get ‘em young!

Fat hate & body image – get ‘em young!

In my guest post on All The Weigh last week (The Invisible [Horrible, Lazy, Unattractive] Fat Person), I talked about how pervasive fat hate — and self hate — is, and that it starts young. In one study, 9-year-old girls ascribed patently negative words to pictures of fat people, and positive words to pictures of thin people.

Now, go younger. Good Morning America featured the story of a six-year-old girl who thinks she is fat. They also assembled a group of young girls to talk about fat, diets and then evaluate pictures of children — thin and chubby. The results? Terrible:

I had a major flashback watching that panel. Some of those girls literally look just like girls I went to elementary school with. I *am* the “chubby wubby” in the blue shirt (omgggggg puberty hitting at 8 and my “tater tots” coming in).

Children get self-hating/fat hating messages everywhere — on TV, in movies, magazines, adverts and their own parents and teachers. They internalize these messages, and turn around and bully each other — a girl in the bathroom asked this six-year-old why she had a fat tummy! What does this say about the adults in these girls’ lives? One girl observes that her mom goes to the gym because she thinks she is overweight — but the daughter doesn’t think so. Another says their teacher is on a diet and “can’t eat cake,” and they ask her when she will be done and she says “not yet.” (even six-year-olds know you can’t keep up a restriction diet, eh?) Can I just say: why the HELL did a teacher tell her students that she’s on a diet? Totally inappropriate.

Listen to these girls and what they’re saying — “my teacher told me,” “my mommy told me”… that I need to be healthy so I don’t get fat.

This is what the health-obsessive awareness campaigns & culture are getting us: not children who are properly healthy minded, but those who fear and stigmatize fat & obesity, and believe you can’t be healthy and “fat.” Problem is, their concept of “fat” is ridiculously skewed, as well.

If the children are our future… the future is bleak.

Posted in Body Issues, Fat Identity, Fat in the Media, Fat Shaming, Featured, Gender Politics & Feminism, In the NewsComments (9)

Jamie’s Food Revolution: Let’s blame fat people for bad choices (I can’t take it anymore)

Lord knows why I keep watching this show. Oh, wait, it’s because I passionately believe in kids, nutrition, shitty school lunches and obesity in America. But the show continues to try my patience. This week, I only got six minutes in before I experienced my first moment of RAGE and ran over here to start a blog post.

It started off so well. Jamie goes to a convention of CA lunch reps, who basically call him out on all the reasons they don’t want to work with him (shock tactics, he’s full of himself as a star, ratings). One admin elaborates in a direct-to-camera interview: he doesn’t want Jamie to demonize people like him. Ok. But then he says:

“We dont want to hear anymore that it’s because of us that Americans are fat. No, they are fat because they decided to be fat. Including me.” (this man is large).

COMMENCE RAGE. (also: file this under Even Fat People Believe in FALC)

I know I’m a broken record, but NO. Nobody chooses to be fat, but just to play along a bit, ok. Let’s say American adults “make choices.” Ok. But children. CHILDREN DO NOT AND CANNOT CHOOSE TO BE FAT. They eat what is given to them and learn lifelong food habits, behaviors and attitudes based on what they observe around them. This includes what their parents show them, as well as what the media and advertising sell them. So if kids can’t CHOOSE to be fat, and it’s adults GIVING THEM BAD CHOICES… and those adults were also given BAD CHOICES as children… feedback loop, ipso facto: NO ONE CHOOSES TO BE FAT. Yes, Jamie’s a didactic, dramatic chef with a myopic view of the American obesity crisis, but you, people preparing school lunches, are not absolved of blame. And you don’t get to BLAME FAT PEOPLE FOR BEING FAT. No.

I just… this makes me so tired. No one wants to feel like it’s their fault for getting kids fat. But come on. People serving lunch to children at school… you have to know you’re doing some bad work. Would you eat this food? It’s gross. (and if you do, you’re probably also overweight and unhealthy) In fairness: schools have been lead astray by a lax FDA. There are larger forces at work.

So I’m ready to have Jamie Oliver go away. I’m not sure how much more of this I can take. Getting angry at Jamie’s Food Revolution is giving me ulcers :P

If you want, you can watch the ep in question:

Posted in Fat in the Media, TVComments (2)

In the news: obese Ohio man fused to chair; dies

In the news: obese Ohio man fused to chair; dies

Stories like this are always incredible, bordering on ridiculous, yet here we have another one: a morbidly obese Ohio man who sat in a recliner chair for the last two years became fused to the chair, and died from the condition. The man was 43.

Gory details from the original news story:

Authorities said he was sitting in his own feces and urine and maggots were visible.

Authorities said they had to cut a hole in the wall to get the man out of his home.

Shockingly, two other able-bodied people lived there—another man, who had a separate bedroom, and the girlfriend of the man who was stuck in the chair. Officials say the girlfriend served food to him, since he never got up.

One officer said it was the worst thing he ever responded to. And most said the worst part of all was the smell. Ironically the landlord says the man in the chair rented from her before and used to be a vital active person.

Key takeaways, that I don’t disagree with – it’s “shocking” that two individuals lived with him and enabled him by feeding him. However, I find it an interesting aside from the landlord that he “used to be an active person.” While of course we don’t know details, and clearly something went horribly wrong, but this smacks of “blame the fat person.” He used to be active, yet he sat in a chair for two years eating and is now dead – man, that awful, lazy, disgusting fat person!

Predictably, Gawker commenters take it to the next level:

Wait. He had a girlfriend!?! Are you sure!?!

translation: fat people are unloveable

When do we find Gwyneth Paltrow’s head in a box?

translation: LOL Sloth from the movie Se7en

It’s a shame, because that guy seemed to have so much for which to live.

translation: mocking comment saying that if you’re that obese, life isn’t worth living (nice).

And, happily, one awesome commenter who calls them on it:

Reading the comments on here is sickening. Not everyone who is overweight is simply enjoying a life of McDonalds and Burger King. There are psychological issues that lead to such a lifestyle and many people can’t deal with it on their own.

<snip>

Why didn’t anyone do anything? Because you can only do so much before realizing your attempts are futile: the person has to want to change their situation, and generally speaking, the level of self-loathing/depression in these types of cases are so high that they can’t see a light at the end of the tunnel, so why bother crawling towards it?

The news story is tragic and sad, but what’s almost worse is the way people are reacting to it. I’m not going to pretend that I haven’t felt the same feeling of revulsion seeing stories like this on the news — maggots, feces and skin fusing to things really icks me out — but you have to look beyond blaming the obese person (and exclaiming the shocking fact they actually had someone who loved them) and think about WHY this person gave up on their life.

Maybe it’s people like the news reporters and commenters who think he was fat, lazy, disgusting, unloveable and didn’t have a life worth living.

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Posted in Comment Fail, Fat in the Media, In the NewsComments (1)



Before & During

Weight & Inches